What is your running foot type?

So you’re a runner. Either you’ve been running for quite awhile or you’re savvy enough to research the sport before you dive in feet first, but the fact remains you’ve been inquisitive enough to find out that there are different running strokes (Gary Coleman not being an option here) and you’re fuzzy on how you fit into these categories. There is a simple test outside of inquiring with your local running shoe / triathlon shoe shop.

Neutral Pronation:

Neutral pronation may be described as an ideal running strike where the foot pronates with proper timing so that your feet utilize their natural cushioning effectively. This timing combines an ideal blend of your foot’s natural cushioning and stability and is in fact, a rare phenomenon among runners.

  • Ideal running strike
  • Running shoes don’t need to have extra cushioning or stability

Pronator: Motion Control / Stability Runner

Overpronation is marked by excessive motion in the foot resulting in an outer foot strike with an aggressive inward roll. Basically this means that the foot is cushioning too much and the runner suffers from a lack of stability.

  • Noticeable¬†wear along the outside of your running shoes
  • A flat foot / lower arch for your feet
  • Referred to as the open pack position
  • Runners need greater support and rigidity in the heel and instep of the shoe, not cushioning

Supinator

This running strike results in a tight inward foot roll so that the foot isn’t able to take advantage of its natural cushioning abilities, resulting in a rigid joint. A runner who is a supinator doesn’t need extra stability in their shoe and should seek a shoe with extra cushioning to help the supinator to run efficiently and prevent injuries over time.

  • Noticeable wear on the heel and instep of your running shoes
  • High arch
  • Referred to as the close pack position
  • Runners need a shoe with maximum cushioning in the heel and instep of their shoes
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